Jan 7

Red Sun Revival – Identities

by Edward, Filed under: Reviews

Identities is the third release  from Red Sun Revival, following the excellent Running From the Dawn and Embers (EP). Red Sun Revival consists of  Rob Leydon, Panos Theodoropoulous, Christina Emery and Matt Helm.    Live drums are provided by Simon Rippin, with Sam Morrison on  keyboards for ‘The Condemned Part I’   Without further fanfare, I’ll get to the music:

Premonition has a piano intro and then launches into  a magnificent bass line, energetic percussion, and  Rob’s trademark powerful vocals.  There is an anthem like quality to the song that rises with each chorus.  Angelic backing vocals add to the intensity.  Guitar, percussion, bass weave layers of sound around the main vocals, and supporting arrangements fill in the tapestry.   

Echoes begins with a classic sort of Gothic choral flourish.   An utterly  fantastic baseline and steady percussion are coupled with keyboards and Rob’s trademark dark vocals.   The pace quickens,  followed with female backing vocals.    Layered choral vocals drift from the depths of the song, the percussion ceases, and then the song fades.   Imagine equal parts 69 Eyes and Mission UK,  with vigorous post-punk percussion and a slight touch of ethereal. 

After a sweeping intro, the bass continues its relentless assault in Four Walls. Keyboards and percussion are dynamic without being overpowering, with a very cool rock guitar solo at about 2:45. Backing arrangements are dark and sweeping.   Vocals are gripping and poignant. I hear a bit of early Clan of Xymox here, and a hint of Garden of Delight.

The Reckoning is a brilliant musical epic, featuring orchestral arrangements with an inexorable,  measured  cadence. Vocals are a touch higher than usual, which lends strength to the sense of impending fate.  There are wonderful bell effects, and strings are gorgeously layered underneath, which resonate profoundly at the end.  

Fade in Time
begins with a choral flourish, then launches into a rousing cavalcade of sound.   The thundering  bass accentuates the sheer crispness of the percussion and backing instrumentation.  This song really reminds me of 69 Eyes, only a tighter and with a fuller sound.  Vocals are a bit more strident than some of the other songs, which heightens the sense of a fervent requiem.    

In Your Name rolls on, with pounding bass and cleaver-sharp keyboards.  Electronic backing effects weave around the vocals and race in counterpoint to the bass.  Keyboards rise between the verses like a wave of sound, then subside briefly as the vocals peal onwards.   There is a strong orchestral effect, then at about 3:50 the guitar sweeps all before it. 

Mistakes begins ominously, then rises with a juxtaposition of poignant vocals and sweeping  electronics and guitar.  Percussion is steady and strong.  “Sometimes when I see your face in dreams, everything becomes just like a memory”. Rock guitar rises to anthem proportions at about 4:20.    This is a fine song for driving down a darkened highway. Play it loud. 

The Condemned part I clocks in at over seven minutes of pure musical doom,  as irresistible as a storm at sea.  The song opens with Heavy, pounding synth and percussion, as irresistible as a storm at sea in the distance.   Keyboards and guitar come to the forefront, with some excellent, eerie backing effects.  I am reminded of Love Like Blood.   The bass becomes stronger,  resonating with rising synth, and then a gripping guitar segment sweeps all before it, in the vein of Pink Floyd’s Delicate Sound of Thunder days.      The song rises to a majestic, thralling peak, as percussion steps in, sharp and inexorable.    Then Rob’s vocals emerge and assume center stage.  Powerful, compelling, yet poignant at the same time, the vocals have Rob’s trademark sense of deep, turbulent  emotions without seeming theatrical or contrived.   As the great Lawrence Welk would say, “Wonderful! Wonderful!” 

After a gripping intro, The Condemned part II continues the grand epic.  The pace picks up, showcasing  some fine guitar work that has some definite bite.   Driving, hypnotic percussion rolls on, pursued by thundering bass.    Vocals are strident, nearly Homeric, but not overreaching, as dark backing synth adds a hint of a chorale and  keyboards add a fine, discernible edge.     

The Awakening begins with clear, evocative keyboards, before the rush of sharp guitar and bass hits.    Upbeat and fast paced, yet oddly reflective, this is the perfect song to end the album. While clearly bass driven,  there is fine support from percussion.   The backing atmospherics are marvelously bleak, but they fill the musical spaces perfectly.  Shadows of Strange Boutique are interwoven  in there somewhere,  and very evocative strings.  Vocals are fast, but with the usual sense of longing.    The song contains a hint of despair, yet is also vibrant with rising hopefulness.

Identities is the best Goth/Postpunk inspired album of 2015.     Very well crafted, both musically and lyrically, Identities displays a superb consistency across the entire album.   There are no “weak” tracks here.  Another reviewer said that this album puts Red Sun Revival on the map, but I think they were already well established on the map with their last two albums.   One of the great things about Red Sun Revival is that they are not rehashing the same old ’80s or  ’90s era Gothic sound like many other  bands.  Intensely original, they eschew the usual leaden, doomy, swirly morass that characterizes much “dark” music.   (If I want to hear that sort of thing, I’ll just dig through my collection.)     Red Sun Revival is firmly here in the 21st century, while clearly building upon their Gothic and Postpunk roots.  We look forward to their fourth album!

http://redsunrevival.com/

https://www.facebook.com/RedSunRevival 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Premonition 4:35
2 Echoes 5:44
3 Four Walls 4:58
4 The Reckoning 5:42
5 Fade In Time 6:08
6 In Your Name 4:37
7 Mistakes 6:37
8 The Condemned Part I 6:37
9 The Condemned Part II 3:21
10 The Awakening
Share This Post No comments

No Comments

Leave a comment